LOCATION
                         OF

"When the sound is so minimal it's almost nothing, how do we know what we are listening to is indeed 'environmental nothingness' or in fact, our own imaginary white noise?"

Traffic's Location Of  is an exploration of open spaces, and the rich environmental sound machine we find ourselves in when exploring space. 

By analysing sounds in their purest form, we begin to notice how saturated ambience is with sounds. These sounds are multi directional, presenting themselves as a cacophony of  thick noise, yet a vast emptiness simultaneously. This radical idea of 'something in the nothings' is what I would describe as an 'environmental nothingness'; that being, the idea that 'silent reflection' is actually extremely rich, so rich in fact that the brain atunes to it, and absorbs it without our knowing ... presents itself to our conscious brain as 'nothing' whilst providing us with great comfort, and in some cases, even greater knowledge.

It is human nature to seek out the comfort of sound. Instinctively, we turn towards sound making as a crutch for safety and security. Sound artist Akio Susuki plays with this idea in his sound works; by encouraging group engagement in the search for noise potentialSusuki would find that others are complicit with his pieces subsequent destruction, if it means the initiation of sound with others. Although, this 'destruction in pursuit of sound' is entirely purposeful and revealing. However, he puts forward the idea that actually, its much deeper than just 'the destruction of art for comfort in sounds' ... in fact, engaging with this work is, 

                                                                        "[going] beyond ways of seeing".*

To Listen, that is, to go beyond hearing, is a sensory experience that involves an awareness to environment and an insensitivity on approach. By giving silence this attentiveness, you realise its creative and academic potential.

                                                                         

 

*Jennie Gottschalk on Akio Susuki's 'Humanity Excavates Sound' 

*Jennie Gottschalk on Akio Susuki's 'Humanity Excavates Sound'